Slide Shows

Module 1: Understanding Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Understanding Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
This slide show explains how healthy lungs function and how non-small cell lung cancer can occur. Non-small cell lung cancer is one of two major types of lung cancer and it is the most common type of lung cancer in the US. This slide show will help you understand what causes this type of cancer and what are its common risk factors. While cigarette smoking is the most significant risk factor, there are other risk factors and this disease can occur in those who have never smoked. If you have been diagnosed with this type of cancer, this slide show will help you know the kinds of questions you should ask when you meet with you doctor, including the goals of treatment and their possible benefits and also possible side effects.
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Module 2: Understanding Small Cell Lung Cancer

Understanding Small Cell Lung Cancer
This slide show explains how healthy lungs function and how small cell lung cancer can occur. Small cell lung cancer is one of two major types of lung cancer and it is the 2nd most common type of lung cancer in the US. This slide show explores what causes this type of cancer and what are its common risk factors. While cigarette smoking is the most significant risk factor, there are other risk factors and this disease can occur in those who have never smoked. If you or a someone you know have been diagnosed with this type of cancer, this slide show will help you know the kinds of questions you should ask when you meet with you doctor, including the goals of treatment and their possible benefits as well as the possible side effects.
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Module 3: Diagnosis and Staging of Lung Cancer

Diagnosis and Screening of Lung Cancer
This slide show explains how most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed. Some patients are diagnosed early (before they feel symptoms) because their doctors notice something in a chest x-ray or another test that was done for other reasons. Doctors use several methods and tests for diagnosing lung cancer and this slide show will help you to discuss these options with your doctor. This slide show also reviews people who are at higher risk for lung cancer and whether they should be screened for lung cancer. Screening is very important to increase the chances of detecting lung cancer early. The earlier the diagnosis the better the outcomes.
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Staging of Lung Cancer
This slide show explains how lung cancer staging is a system that doctors use to describe or classify the overall size and spread of the main tumor. Doctors need lung cancer staging information to help plan a patient’s treatment. Lung cancer is classified into several stages - the higher the stage the more advanced the spread of the disease and the more aggressive the treatment strategy. In Stage 0 the cancer is only in the top layers of the cells lining the lung’s air passages and this is the easiest stage to treat. In Stage IV the cancer has spread to the other lung, lymph nodes outside the lungs, and other parts of the body.
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Module 4: Treatment and Management of Lung Cancer

Treatment and Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)
This slide show explains how most patients with NSCLC are treated more than 1 type of treatment. That can include with surgery, radiation therapy, or drug therapy. In various stages of lung cancer, there are also supportive treatments to ease pain and discomfort; prevent and treat side effects; help you deal with stress and anxiety; and if you have not already done so, to help you stop smoking. Palliative treatments also exist to ease symptoms and improve quality of life.
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Treatment and Management of Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC)
This slide show explains how most patients with small cell lung cancer are treated. Most patients receive chemotherapy (or "chemo" for short) and radiation therapy. There are also supportive treatments to ease pain and discomfort; prevent and treat side effects; help you deal with stress and anxiety; and if you have not already done so, to help you stop smoking. Palliative treatments also exist to ease symptoms and improve quality of life.
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Module 5: Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer

Understanding Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer
This slide show explains how immunotherapy works for lung cancer. Immunotherapy uses medicine to stimulate the body's immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. The immunotherapy drugs that are most often used to treat lung cancer are called "checkpoint inhibitors." On the surface of cancer cells there are proteins that “put the brakes” on the immune system. They serve as “checkpoints” that stop the immune system from launching an all-out assault on cancer. Checkpoint inhibitors work by “taking off the brakes” and giving the immune system free rein to release special cells called T cells that attack the cancer. Watch to learn about checkpoint proteins called PD-1, PD-L1, CTLA-4, considerations for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy, as well as learn about possible side effects of immunotherapy for lung cancer.
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Immunotherapy Treatments for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)
This slide show provides an overview of several immunotherapy treatments that have been approved for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Immunotherapy is the use of medicines to stimulate the body's immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. This slide show also describes how your doctor will evaluate whether immunotherapy is right for you, possible treatment side effects, and clinical trials. It's important to discuss all treatment options with your doctor or cancer care team, so you can make the best decisions that are right for you. Side effects of immunotherapy are often treated with prednisone, a drug that suppresses your immune system. Your immunotherapy will be stopped until the side effects clear up.
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Immunotherapy Treatments for Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC)
This slide show provides an overview of several immunotherapy treatments that have been approved for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immunotherapy is the use of medicines to stimulate the body's immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. This slide show also describes how your doctor will evaluate whether immunotherapy is right for you, possible treatment side effects, and clinical trials. It’s very important to report any side effects to your health care team promptly. Side effects of immunotherapy are often treated with drugs that suppress your immune system. Your immunotherapy will be stopped until the side effects clear up. Discuss all of your treatment options as with your health care team, so you can make decisions that are right for you. If there’s anything you don’t understand, ask to have it explained.
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